developing at home and office, would GIT be easier than SVN using xcopy?

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Answers

  1. Armani

    • 2016/5/11

    I recommend git.

    Either way you're going to want the canonical repository on the USB key. In git you might do this:

    Make a "bare" repo on the USB key:

    $ mkdir /path/to/usbkey/myapp.git
    $ cd /path/to/usbkey/myapp.git/
    $ git init --bare
    Initialized empty Git repository in /path/to/usbkey/myapp.git/
    

    Bare repository directories are usually named "something.git" - you can name them whatever you want, but the ".git" convention is very widely used.

    Now you can clone the repo:

    $ cd /my/source/dir/
    $ git clone /path/to/usbkey/myapp.git
    Initialized empty Git repository in /my/source/dir/myapp/.git/
    warning: You appear to have cloned an empty repository.
    

    It will warn you that the repo is empty. Let's put something in it:

    $ cd myapp
    $ echo "some stuff." > README
    $ git add README
    $ git commit -m 'added a README'
    [master (root-commit) 155b8ea] added a README
     1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
     create mode 100644 README
    

    And then push it to the USB key:

    $ git push origin master
    Counting objects: 3, done.
    Writing objects: 100% (3/3), 231 bytes, done.
    Total 3 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0)
    Unpacking objects: 100% (3/3), done.
    To /path/to/usbkey/myapp.git
     * [new branch]      master -> master
    

    When you get to your other computer, just clone the repo from your USB key again. You'll have to make sure you remember to push your changes, but you know you'll always have a backup because you'll have three full copies of the repo whenever you're synced up.

    An alternate way to do it with git is to only have one repo - the one on the USB key. You wouldn't ever have to remember to push to it, but your code would only be on the key unless you used some other explicit backup system. That would be bad.

    If you were to use SVN on the USB key you would still have to remember to commit and pull your changes in the same way has having a bare git repo, but you wouldn't get the free automatic backups that doing so with git gives you. Also you would miss out on all the other niceties of git, but that's a whole other discussion. See Why Git is Better Than X.

  2. Turner

    • 2017/6/15

    The coolest interface to (Sub)version control. TortoiseSVN is an Apache Subversion (SVN) client, implemented as a Windows shell extension. It's intuitive and 

  3. Cyrus

    • 2019/7/8

    Apache Subversion, also known as Subversion, SVN represents the most popular centralized version control system on the market. With a centralized system, all files and historical data are stored on a central server. Developers can commit their changes directly to that central server repository. Work is comprised of three parts:

  4. Keanu

    • 2020/6/13

    Git vs. SVN: Feature Comparison. Here are the biggest feature differences between Git vs. SVN. Find out which tool is better for which purposes.

  5. Lee

    • 2017/12/12

    With Git, in addition to having bare git repository on USB for transfer (as in Neall and dj2 answers), you can also use "git bundle" command for off-line transfer.

  6. Louie

    • 2021/2/13

    Imagine you are a developer on the road, you develop on your laptop and you want to have source control so that you can go back 3 hours. With Git, you do not have the SVN problem. Your local copy is a repository, and you can commit to it and get all benefits of source control.

  7. Mack

    • 2019/3/24

    Who uses Subversion?

  8. Javion

    • 2017/6/6

    Descriptions. TortoiseSVN, a Windows shell extension, gives feedback on the state of versioned items by adding overlays to the icons in the Windows Explorer.Repository commands can be executed from the enhanced context menu provided by Tortoise.

  9. Kamryn

    • 2020/7/31

    As Dj2 said, both can work, but Git is clearly the best choice, for that purpose. I found anyway a bit strange to base a so crucial choice on a "side-feature" like this one...

  10. Jamal

    • 2016/4/2

    This chapter is a short, casual introduction to Subversion. If you're new to version control, this chapter is definitely for you. We begin with a discussion of general 

  11. Landen

    • 2017/11/11

    Apache Subversion (often abbreviated SVN, after its command name svn) is a software versioning and revision control system distributed as open source under the Apache License. Software developers use Subversion to maintain current and historical versions of files such as source code, web pages, and documentation.

  12. Kingsley

    • 2015/6/8

    Well it means that instead of running `svn checkout (url)` to get the latest version of your repository, with Git you run `git clone (url)`, which gives 

  13. Steven

    • 2016/2/29

    Either one would work. If you were using SVN you could just do your work off of the USB key. With Git, you have the possibility of cloning the repo off the the key and just pushing to the key when you're ready to move your data to the office.

  14. Colten

    • 2019/1/17

    Git SVN is a feature in Git that allows changes to move between a Subversion and a Git

  15. Villa

    • 2015/5/6

  16. Rafael

    • 2017/10/10

    Apache Subversion (often abbreviated SVN, after its command name svn) is a software versioning and revision control system distributed as open source under the Apache License. Software developers use Subversion to maintain current and historical versions of files such as source code, web pages, and documentation.

  17. Ambrose

    • 2019/6/16

    Easy, GIT or some other DVCS - not because DVCS is inherently better than, say, subverion but because a DVCS is a better match to your requirements in the way it allows you to work.

    In the abscence of a network connection you're not going to be able to run/access SVN from your "server" repository and that kind of defeats the purpose whereas with DVCS you can use a cloned repository on your USB key as a bridge between the two dev environments.

  18. Cassius

    • 2015/9/2

    Despite all the marketing buzz related to Git, such notable open source projects as FreeBSD and LLVM continue to use Subversion as the main 

  19. Kye

    • 2018/2/17

    First of all, SVN requires a centralized server. In contrast to GIT, which is able to act as both client and server. Thus, SVN is called a centralized version control system. Secondly, SVN doesn’t provide advanced tools for branching. Branches are just so-called cheap copies of a directory. In simple words, a copy isn’t a literal copy of a file.

  20. Mazza

    • 2015/8/21

    AnkhSVN

  21. Alexzander

    • 2019/9/7

    45 Subversion jobs available in San Jose, CA on Indeed.com. Apply to Release Engineer, Software Test Engineer, Front End Developer and more!

  22. Zyon

    • 2019/9/28

    Pros: Has been in use for many years and is considered mature technology. Cons: Moving or renaming files does not include a 

  23. Erik

    • 2016/9/16

    Usability is another differentiator between SVN and Git. How It Works. SVN uses the command line as the primary user interface. It is more readily used by non-programmers who want to version non-code assets. Learn more about SVN commands. Git also uses the command line as the primary user interface. But the syntax in Git can overwhelm beginners.

  24. Jerome

    • 2016/2/3

    By default, git-svn will create Git commits with just the username from SVN as Git author. New commits in Git will have your full Git user information but once you 

  25. Musa

    • 2019/7/27

    Git SVN is a feature in Git that allows changes to move between a Subversion and a Git repository. Git SVN is a good feature to use if you need to allow changes to go between Git and SVN repositories. Git vs. SVN: Feature Comparison Here are the biggest feature differences between Git vs. SVN. Find out which tool is better for which purposes.

  26. Dorian

    • 2021/2/9

  27. Wade

    • 2017/9/22

    Apache Subversion (SVN) is a free and open-source software developed by the Apache Software Foundation that acts as a control system for tracking changes to files, folders and directories. It is used to assist in recovering data and recording the history of changes made over time. It was designed to replace the Concurrent Versions System (CVS), a program designed to save and retrieve multiple source code changes that had many inherent bugs and feature flaws.

  28. Wilson

    • 2020/4/4

    QSvn

  29. Dexter

    • 2019/3/13

    Installing Subversion. Configuring the Subversion Server as a Service. Setting Up a Repository. Understanding SVN Workflow. Considerations for Tagging and​ 

  30. Davion

    • 2020/6/21

    Version Control System (VCS) is a software that helps software developers to work together and maintain a complete history of their work. Following are the goals of a Version Control System. Allow developers to work simultaneously. Do not overwrite each other’s changes.

  31. Jayden

    • 2018/4/8

    Is subversion and SVN same?

  32. Luis

    • 2019/12/5

    The command svn copy is used for branching because branch is technically a copy of the source you copy from. However, it is not an ordinary copy that you are familiar with when copying files on your local file system. Branches in Subversion repositories are so called "Cheap Copies" that are similar to symlinks.

  33. Orion

    • 2020/7/8

    GitLab

  34. Gabriel

    • 2018/11/27

    The file is unchanged in the working directory, and no changes to that file have been committed to the repository since its working revision. An svn commit of the​ 

  35. Sylas

    • 2018/7/16

    This chapter is a short, casual introduction to Subversion. If you're new to version control, this chapter is definitely for you. We begin with a discussion of general version control concepts, work our way into the specific ideas behind Subversion, and show some simple examples of Subversion in use.

  36. Ellis

    • 2021/3/27

    Git

  37. Luciano

    • 2016/9/21

    Directory structure. Each reference, or labeled snapshot of a commit, in a project is organized within specific subdirectories, such as trunk , branches , and tags .

  38. Arjun

    • 2021/1/12

    In GitHub, even if single point failure occurs, we can still commit the changes as the developer is using it in the local repository until it gets fixed. In SVN, if node failure happens then some code breaks the build flow and the developers can’t commit the work.

  39. Angel

    • 2019/3/18

  40. Yahir

    • 2021/10/6

    The first step when using TortoiseSVN, is to download a local working copy of your repository. Start by creating a directory where you will store the working copy. Right-click on the folder and the Explorer context menu will appear, along with some new TortoiseSVN commands. Select SVN Checkout…'

  41. Montanari

    • 2019/11/5

    Initializes the git-svn repository corresponding to a remote subversion repository with the standard layout. git svn init <svn-repo-url> --stdlayout --prefix=origin/.

  42. Madden

    • 2019/3/4

    There are several ways to migrate from SVN to Git. The approach outlined in this article is based on using git-svn, a Git extension, which can be used to check out a Subversion repository to a local Git repository and then push changes from the local Git repository back to the Subversion repository.

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